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What exactly does an oncologist do?

What exactly does an oncologist do?

An oncologist is a doctor who treats cancer and provides medical care for a person diagnosed with cancer.

Does a referral to an oncologist mean you have cancer?

Oncologists are doctors who diagnose and treat cancer. They often act as the main healthcare provider for someone with cancer—designing treatment plans, offering supportive care, and sometimes coordinating treatment with other specialists.

Why would someone see an oncologist?

Takeaway. You will likely be referred to an oncologist if your doctor suspects that you have the disease. Your primary care physician may carry out tests to determine if you might have cancer. If there are any signs of cancer, your doctor may recommend visiting an oncologist as soon as possible.

What is the difference between hematology and oncology?

Hematologists specialize in diagnosing and treating blood diseases. Oncologists specialize in diagnosing and treating cancers.

Why is it called oncology?

The term oncology literally means a branch of science that deals with tumours and cancers. The word “onco” means bulk, mass, or tumor while “-logy” means study.

What are three ways that cancer is treated?

The most common treatments are surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Other options include targeted therapy, immunotherapy, laser, hormonal therapy, and others. Here is an overview of the different treatments for cancer and how they work. Surgery is a common treatment for many types of cancer.

What is the difference between oncology and hematology?

Why is hematology and oncology together?

It is common for hematologists to also train in oncology, which is the study, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. The combined training allows these doctors to treat a range of blood-related illnesses, including some cancers.

What are blood cancers called?

Most blood cancers, also called hematologic cancers, start in the bone marrow, which is where blood is produced. Blood cancers occur when abnormal blood cells start growing out of control, interrupting the function of normal blood cells, which fight off infection and produce new blood cells.